We Will Not See Gender Equality in Our Lifetime, Nor Will Our Daughters See it in Theirs

Gender Parity won’t happen for almost 100 years and we are worse off for it.

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Gender Equality 100 Years Away Photo by Aitof on Pixabay
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World Economic Forum Global Gender Gap Index Rankings 2020
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Global Gender Gap Report — World Economic Forum
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Gender Parity — Equal Pay Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay
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Gender Equality — Unconscious Biases Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Unconscious Biases — We All Have Them

Unconscious bias can be based on a variety of characteristics including but not limited to skin color, accents, education, disabilities, family status, and gender. We all have them, and it affects the balance of diversity in the workforce, who gets promoted, big titles, retention efforts, and shapes your organization’s culture. A study conducted at Yale University found that male and female scientists — trained to reject the subjective — still were more likely to hire men, consider them more competent, and pay them more per year than women.

The Gender Gap in STEM

A wide gender gap has been prevalent in the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, math) for decades. According to the World Economic Forum, only 16 percent of female students graduate from science and technology subjects compared to 47 percent of men. And the lack of positive narratives, built-in gender biases, and poor retention policies push women out of STEM careers, with unequal treatment being the number one reason.

Based on data pulled from LinkedIn, the World Economic Forum found women are under-represented in the majority of rapidly growing STEM fields. Women make up only 26% of the workforce in data and AI, 15% among those with engineering skills, and 12% among those with cloud computing skills.

5 Ways to Help Promote Gender Equality in the Workplace

  1. Acknowledging that there is (in the majority of cases) a bias problem and it affects the way we make promotion and hiring decisions which in turn leads to fewer women in key positions
  2. Ensure through transparent pay structures that equal pay is given for fair value and reduce wage gaps
  3. Create a leadership program for your organization and encourage women to be a part of it
  4. Look for opportunities for sponsorship, mentorship, and networking
  5. Think more like Iceland
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Gender Equality — More Women in the Boardroom Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Marketing Professional, Mentor, Speaker and Co-host of the TIF Women in Emerg-Tech: Power Lunch Series

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